iapresentation

Children’s Menu

Posted in content, Data, design, forms by solle on 20/09/2009

Great children’s menu from Ask restaurants. Interactive (paper based), colourful (add your own), pictures (what does the food look like, inviting. I don’t mind if more menus were like this for everyone.

ask menu
ask-2
ask menu

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Links, bookmarks, discoveries

Posted in content, ideas, links, Online by solle on 11/07/2009

Week ending 11 July

Profits before patients: Wendell Potter talks to Bill Moyers about 20 years inside the health care industry with perfect Dante quote “The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, maintain a neutrality.”

Kosmix – semantic search engine – what’s happening on the web (well quite a lot really and it isn’t only conversations regarding the custody of MJ’s children.

Joshua Porter’s Designing with psychology in mind

Eventually discovered Tiltshift for the iPhone

Considering the somewhat different paths Great Designs Should Be Experienced and Not Seen and Disruption versus Usability: has UXD become TOO good? and Design With Intent: How designers can influence behavior

Started playing around with Mapumental

Fill up a page of your sketchbook a day – Pretty sketchy and its Flickr group

Post-it easel pads

Future Perfect

Walking Papers: Print maps, draw on them, scan them back in

Maglev toy train

User Experience Trading Cards – check the ones you didn’t manage to get at UXLondon

The 1kb CSS Grid and the Grid System Generator

From Adactio Revealing Design Treasures from The Amazon

Maps as service design: The Incidental

Google Dark – godark.us

Web Trend Map V 2_1 – about

@craigmod – nice grid

AxLib – A robust design library of usable interaction patterns for Axure RP

Smart.fm and An owl’s life

ruiz+company – design inspiration

cortex – Xavier Encinas Studio personal visual library

@font-face: The potential of web typography

Content-Preserving Warps for 3D Video Stabilization

Abandoned Britain – Photographing ruins

Matt Webb and his opening presentation at reboot 11. Scope – Design and contributing to culture; ourselves as individuals and the big picture; taking action.

10 informative web design presentations

keep an eye on this – Luca De Rosso’s OTTO Beatslicing is more fun when you hold the sample in your hands

Open Plaques

Stop motion paper prototyping

Best RSS feeds for information graphics

Design Ethnography & Mood Maps over at Semantic Foundry

and Hicks Design Icons for Interaction and a revisit to Old News about Icons

and finally The Best of French Cheeses

Proud of my Buck Rogers puzzles (here’s an example)

Buck Rogers puzzle

Buck Rogers puzzle

and

That I must complete my input for Russell Davies’ Speculative Modelling

Finish my cardboard camera

hole-on ex

& finish my cardboard menagerie

cardboard menagerie

Safari 4.0: better looking in beta

Posted in content, design, information architecture, UX by solle on 09/06/2009

After downloading Safari 4, I am disappointed to see Apple not stick with some of the tab ideas they had in the Safari 4 beta. What they’ve returned to I find muddled and confusing. In the beta the tabs were above the address bar and this seemed quite radical for a number of people. I found it refreshing and ‘open’ – the pulling of tabs into new windows was clear and straightforward and the tools/arrows/buttons for adding a new tab, viewing the rest of your open tabs and viewing any other bookmarks in the bookmark bar were clearly positioned (see below). The beta, like Firefox, really felt like a ‘tool set’ rather than just a browser.

Now in the released version the tabs have come back to the traditional position and the position of the tools/arrows/buttons for adding a new tab, viewing the rest of your open tabs and viewing any other bookmarks in the bookmark bar are now close together, two with identical icon and, my small amount of testing, encourage mis-selection and confusion. And pulling a tab out into a window is not clear at all.

It would be interesting to know what occurred during any testing for Apple to step back from the some of the innovations of the beta.

Safari 4

Safari 4

Safari 4 beta

Safari 4 beta

Watching digital readers

Posted in content, Data, ideas, Online by solle on 02/06/2009

One of the things our grandchildren will find quaintest about us is that we distinguish the digital from the real‘ William Gibson

Somewhere between Nicholas Carr’s ‘Is Google Making us Stupid?‘ and Clive Thompson on the Future of Reading in a Digital World there is the issue of how we are viewed when we read. It has become increasingly evident that depending on how you are reading, what you are reading and upon what you are reading you are viewed very differently.

how-computer-works

It is said that it is more acceptable to read a newspaper at the breakfast table than a paperback novel. Why? Is it because the viewer can see something of what the reader is reading and approximately where they are in their reading but with a paperback novel it is hard to establish exactly what is being read and where the reader is? Books can seem private and cut off.

Is reading a newspaper or magazine or book at the breakfast table more acceptable than reading from a Kindle (or like), laptop or iPhone (or like)? Why? Is it because the viewer can see something of what the reader is reading and approximately where they are in their reading – be it the title, the cover, the cover story or at very least that it is a book or a newspaper etc – but when the reader is using a digital device they can’t even be sure they are actually reading and if they are reading you have no way (apart from maybe facial expressions) what they are reading? Viewer feels no sense of engagement.

Of course in some circumstances (ie dinner party) it is frowned upon to read anything but especially a newspaper or a paperback novel but you might just be able to squeeze in reading a short summary of a sporting event on your mobile phone without too much objection (or risk of never being invited again).

Likewise when attending a lecture, panel event or roundtable it is perfectly acceptable to multi task reading connected and non connected stuff from a mobile phone or laptop – the feeling is that the reader is still engaged with their surroundings, involved with the event, in the conversation – but reading a newspaper or book in this environment would give the impression of non interest, non engagement, being separate from their surroundings (even though they may be reading something directly relevant).

Like the William Gibson quote describes, in time these differentiations will become quaint references to a time when individuals discussed the digital and non-digital/’real’.

Please comment below with any other references on the subject.

Thanks newhousedesign for Ladybird picture

CV format – is it broken? Does it need fixing

Posted in content, design, forms, ideas by solle on 27/05/2009

Recently I have been playing around with my CV frustrated with the standard format. I have tried out various ideas including a persona style and one based on a grid but am still scratching my chin not quite sure if I have solved a problem that as one recruiter recently offered maybe ‘doesn’t need fixing’.

There is no doubt that a growing number of design types (especially those more at the beginning and development of careers – where ultimately a strong CV is most relevant) have realised that they have got to increase chances of being ‘noticed’ whatever it might be for and the starting point is obviously been to visually enhance their CVs.

various CV examples

The conversation has picked up with the growing interest and spread of infographics. Fine examples are Michael Anderson’s and Greg Dizzia’s. Web Designer Depot added to the discussion with a recent post 30 Artistic and Creative Résumés that garned plenty of discussion regarding readability and inappropriateness of overkill design – ‘a CV is meant to be a document not a poster’ ‘a CV is meant to convey information… your portfolio is for showing off your creativity’. And as one creative director writes quite scathingly ‘I mostly ignore these types of vanity projects when I get them. They look like some school assignment. I want to know about you in 5 seconds. And, that comes from the text.’

There’s no doubt that hiring folk when looking through CVs look for well organised and easily skimmable documents that a decision can be quickly made on.

So what to do? How do you create a balance?

The discussion has also started to appear on Twitter where some good ideas have cropped up such as Bob van Vliet and Clement Boutignon’s innovative use of Daytum.

My advice is pull out a grid and ensure that the written words describing your successes, experiences and deeds are easily readable. If you feel you can add some visual accoutrement to it without obscuring the main information then go ahead though a good barometer is to get as much feedback as you can from recruiters and HR professionals. Some will love innovation, some will be more than non plussed.

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micro thoughts & quotes, discoveries

Posted in content, Data, ideas, links by solle on 22/05/2009

Media’s want to break free

Heady growth in online advertising encouraged countless start-ups and traditional media businesses to chase the same business model. But the belief that online advertising would grow fast enough to fulfil all the business plans riding on it was “almost a collective psychosis”, says Rob Grimshaw, managing director of FT.com.

London iA Google Custom Search

How to be better at digital, or interactive, or new media or whatever it’s called…
How to be better at digital, or interactive, or new media or whatever it’s called…
First they laugh at you. Then they hate you. And then you win.

…being obsessive about user experience and treating it like software

From Siri Hustvedt’s book Sorrows of an American

“If we run low on on empathy, we can always refuel on guilt”

Dieu seul sait quoi (God alone knows what this is) Doctor’s classification of injured First World War soldiers.

Designing site structures for intranets and websites

Creating site structures, especially for large intranets and websites, cannot be hurried. It needs to be designed with user needs and future change and scalability in mind. For this to happen there needs to be a plan and this plan needs to be created from sound principles. This article provides introductory material on how this can take shape.

User Experience = Management Development Visualisation (informationarchitects.jp)

Concept Maps

Including A Model of The Creative Process, A Model of Play and A Model of Innovation

Creating Inspiration

where I found Sky Catcher from Amsterdam

Persuasive web design (presentation from recent German IA conference)

Marrying Web Analytics and User Experience (Louis Rosenfeld presentation from recent German IA conference)

Flickr machine tag browser

Huffduffer machine tags

UXCampLondon is all go

The ultimate ways to test your site (Cennydd Bowles)

Structured Procrastination

Flairbuilder user interface prototypes and wireframes

Axure for Mac – coming soon (about time considering everyone I know who uses the existing version runs it on Windows on a Mac.

Lego Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright LEGO Sets (launched in conjunction with present Show at the Guggenheim)

Fused Network – seems like good hosting

We made this – natty design blog

this week’s inspiration

Posted in content, Data, links by solle on 05/05/2009

has to start with Milton Glaser’s 10 Things I Have Learned (from 2001) with gems from John Cage, Fritz Perls, Iris Murdoch and of course Milton himself. Good advice never ages.

MIT publish all course work free and without registration.

New York Stories – narrative audio and photo profiles of New Yorkers

(also from New York) New Sonic Youth album, The Eternal

Google Sites

London IA Google Custom Search

All the books you could possibly desire on Typography

Nice layout – globeandmail.com

euroia – Europe’s Fifth Information Architecture Summit

The Future of Wireframes

McMoon – Behind the counter of an abandoned McDonalds lie 48,000 lbs of 70mm tape… the only copy of extremely high-resolution images of the moon.

Eucalyptus. The library to go on iPhone

All our yesterdays

Wooden bicycle

Designing for Faceted Search

Inside Dylan’s mind

Complex inferiority: user experience in the UK

Skimmer

“1 in 1,300 purchasers writes a review. With a standard 2% conversion rate, you need 3 million visitors/day to get useful reviews.” (hat tip @iA)

Information Architects site redesign (iteration image on Flickr)

next stage of Online Form Innovation Awards

and of course the London IA group

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This week’s tabs/links/bookmarks

Posted in content, Data, ideas, links by solle on 26/04/2009

Multivariate testing

Posted in Audience Development, Business, content, Data, Online, SEO by solle on 31/03/2009

Time to revisit econsultancy’s list of multivariate testing tools written by Ashley Friedlein in 2007.

Checking over Ashley’s list to see who’s still in business with a relevant offering (and who’s been snapped up by a competitor):

Specific multivariate / multivariable / split testing tools and services:

Adlucent – a variety of testing tools including landing page optimisation

Google Website Optimizer – Google has kindly released a 26 page Techie Guide to Google Website Optimizer which everyone has no excuse not to take a look at to get you started

Memetrics – is now part of Accenture’s Digital Optimization Marketing Sciences

Offermatica – is now Omniture’s Test & Target

Optimost – is now Interwoven Optimost offering a wide range of testing services

SiteSpect – a variety of testing tools

SplitAnalyzer – $129, online demo available, immediate download

TaguchiNow – free webinar available

Vertster – free demo available

Site conversion optimisation solutions (typically continuous learning approach):

[x+1] – with its Predictive Optimization Engine

Kefta – recently purchased by Acxiom

Maxymiser – selection of products

Touch Clarity (Omniture)

ATG Campaign Optimizer

Wunderloop – international offering

And from the article’s comments:

Amadesa – range of tools including form and cart optimisation

Clickdensity – more of a usability toolkit including heatmaps (see my data visualisation round up)

Sokel Choicepoints (site itself looks like it needs ‘optimising’)

Mixpanel – a range of tools

Plenty there to choose from. Obviously anyone new to this who wants to get their hands dirty should start off with Google’s Optimiser tool.

naming and shaming

Posted in Business, content, Data, forms, Online by solle on 16/03/2009

here begins the naming and shaming of organisations that after you enter extensive personal details etc on their website they immediately email back to you the password you have just entered (and confirmed) unencrypted for anyone to see.

password-strength

Passwords look pretty damn scary in plain text.

First up (and many more to follow):

1. StepStone Solutions with responsibility for Channel 4’s recruitment are the first guilty party (appalling, they even sent a reminder with the naked password repeated a week later)

2. Lastminute

3. Be

4. EventBrite

5. Live Nation

6. Grazr

7. Sky News

8. AddThis

9. The Daily Express

10. Harringey Library (in regard to wi-fi)

11. British Library (in regard to wi-fi)

12. Daily Star

13. Serph

14. Newscred

15. Days Out Guide

16. Fused Network

17. Wired.com