iapresentation

Pick of the UXLondon Twitter postings

Posted in Twitter, UX by solle on 26/06/2009

Below is my pick of the UXLondon Twitter postings. I have plans to do a little bit more of a ‘visual’ thing with them but for the moment here they are as a list in no particular order – the visual will follow:

And attendees of @uxlondon were unfortunate to miss ‘Shaping the Future of Mixed Plastics’ which clashed http://tinyurl.com/m5fu5t Shame…  
New blog post reviewing #uxlondon http://www.whiteoctober.co.uk/blog/2009/06/19/uxlondon/  
So true: Simple things can be complex. Complex things can be understandable. Complexity isn’t simply Complicatedness.
“Reading “”101 Things I Learned in Architecture School”” by Matthew Frederick, per @lukewdesign’s recommendation
Shattered after UX London. Must have drawn 50 planed arrows since yesterday
In Jared Spool’s workshop at #uxlondon. Reminds me of Bible verse – There is nothing new under the sun
Yip, that’s my slump from UXLondon high complete … now back down to earth…  
@UXlondon one thing to improve on, albeit nothing to do with the actual event, you need a back-network-styled website so people can connect.
“Some do, but others are happy with sketches. Learnt at #uxlondon: “”All you really need is a picture and a conversation.””  “
RT @odannyboy: My #uxlondon slides from my workshop http://is.gd/15b3Z and presentation http://is.gd/15b4G are up on Slideshare
@leisa slides for her #uxlondon workshop are now on slideshare (http://bit.ly/1IfSvQ )
Back in the office after #UXLondon {sigh} … where do I begin?!
fjordaan If you missed yesterday’s tweetstorm, my #uxlondon summary is up on our blog http://is.gd/158XD
@uxlondon will be pulling stuff together and there will also be a redux of the whole thing in various forms.
anti-patterns’ http://bit.ly/17yCa #uxlondon
@pocopina haven’t heard the words ‘social media’ once at #uxlondon – lets keep it that way 🙂
Back at work after #uxlondon. A pile of business cards and receipts on my desk is slowly forming into a semblance of order.
#uxlondon – had a great time and really enjoyed the talks and meeting all the UX folks. Time to process the inbox…
Sketches are a very powerful tool, much more so if you master your medium. #uxlondon – Sketching is key to the design process.
Number 41 of my UX methods trading cards is missing. Help. Help. #uxlondon
Disappointed at @jmspool workshop: learned these truths 7yrs ago. Easy targets and Jakob-like dogmatism. #uxlondon
@jmspool really enjoyed your workshop at uxlondon… stuff i kinda knew but great to get true confirmation.
@UXlondon @cennydd is running his workshop in an agile fashion. People are playing planning poker to decide what to cover!
Great way to finish #uxlondon; a drink with @clagnut with a discussion of font embedding, Silverback and Agile/UX. UX geekout is complete.  
there’s a usability conference going on in London – someone I follow is tweeting from that rubbish from there #UXLondon
hoping to find something to provoke my enthusiasm in the way uxlondon has done for yours. Sounds like a great event
Remarkable observation from Maggie Hanley:no English speakers & all the woman presenters at #uxlondon were Australian.
Wish there were 3 of me so I could have seen everything or just had enough brain to absorb it all!
Enjoying wi-fi on train home from #uxlondon – Nowhere near O’Reilly #railsconf standards, but Jared Spool and @lukewdesign rocked!
Wireframes 2.0 validated the path I’m on, but dare I go the final step and abandon paper altogether? On some projects, yes. @odannyboy’s brainstorming workshop certainly made us think, but IMO doesn’t answer trickiest thing: how to reach consensus.   Disappointed at @jmspool workshop: learned these truths 7yrs ago. Easy targets and Jakob-like dogmatism. Also, uninteractive. #uxlondon
Conference highlight presentation from Don Norman, starting with apparent heresy: Complexity is not a problem. Complicated is.   Design as activity, not artifact. Designer as facilitator, not rockstar. Start from experience, not system @peterme
Intuitive = reducing target knowledge; subtly increasing current knowledge
Architecture learnings. Parti = guiding concept for design decisions  
Enjoy your cut ‘n paste, folks. I’ll enjoy my evening of free beer and birthday fun. #uxlondon #priorities
2 options for survey: ‘No thanks’ and ‘Do survey later’. Think they need a Plan B.
In fact I’d even go so far as to say that #uxlondon has reconfirmed my love for what I do and that the future of UX is very bright indeed.
@cennydd on agile: distributed teams do not work. Yup, got experience with that!
“quote of #uxlondon? (by retweet volume)””You could look at what your competitors are doing. That way you can always be one step behind them
@cennydd being railroaded into writing book about Agile UX by audience 🙂
Watching @jmspool take down the m&s site live, funny end to #uxlondon
design research: discussion guide – start as wide as possible, narrow slowly
you must be stupid, you got three stupid users”” client response when first watching a lab usability test @leisa”
Everyone loves doing design work, and everybody can do design, with collaboration/facilitation. My main take-away, I think.
the most striking truth of the curve is that zero users give zero insights (JN – final one of @leisa ‘s presentation)  
the most important brand message is task completion”” says @jmspool”
even the smallest amount of data beats none”” (JN)
Users don’t think in sections – developers do.
Scent Depends on Context: Generic links at the bottom of the page are contextless.
a suitable time to remind anyone who missed it of Marrying Web Analytics and User Experience http://bit.ly/Jduw3
….don’t be afraid of getting a bit creative (@leisa) #uxlondon  
Is it worth the resources put in to create decorative graphics if you haven’t got the content right?
self reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behaviour (JN)  
” 205. Mesquaresmall_normal Mark_Stringer RT @rapella “”our brains just don’t work the way we think they do”” (@leisa) #uxlondon thx @solle 2 days ago from web    “
“””our brains just don’t work the way we think they do”” (@leisa)
when to do design research? I say it never stops
design research will get you empathetic ‘to solve a problem you must first understand it’ (Kim Goodwin)
“Search is users creating their own links. They type in the trigger word they were expecting. “”Bring your own link”
great mixture of people in this workshop from many different places and job types
@leisa asking everyone their names and 3 tags that describe them
Force writing: Come up with 2 words that are opposites and figure how they can work with the problem
#UXLondon is like sending the creative half of your brain to a gymnasium for days. Really enjoyable stuff.
I really am the only person here without an iPhone and a Mac.
Ux mgmt. Key to growth and impact is to increase reputation. But how does one measure that?
Lots of shoes being waved in the air in this morning workshop with Eric Reiss.
the word ideation impresses clients
Excited about sketching workshop at #uxlondon. Won’t be tweeting, it’s pen time 🙂 pencil, then pen time (practiceyourgrip)
If you have a good experience you will tell three friends. If you are an unhappy customer, you will tell 17 people
When users comparison-shop using pogostick techniques: purchase=11% . Compare to 55% using product lists.
@lukewdesign: All my notes from #uxlondon today: http://www.lukew.com/ff/archive.asp
lukewdesign Left the pub to go hear design talks in a loft. What’s wrong with me?
@odannyboy workshop summary: Collaboratively sketch concepts rapidly and without fear. Quantity first. Refine and define later.
workshop summary: home pages should look more like site maps
Who will they invite next year: Alan Cooper, Jacob Nielsen and JJ Garrett? Tough deal to beat this lineup.
if your team succeeds all the time, then fire them. They’re not trying hard enough. Bill Buxton
@leisa: When users comparison-shop using pogostick techniques: purchase=11% . Compare to 55% using product lists
Another good day at #uxlondon. Not sure I agree with a couple of things @jmspool said however hard to argue with his real user testing stats
Learned how to draw a circle in UX London – put your pinky on the page and have a couple of practice gos in the air first
if you’re not spending time watching people use your site there is no way you’re designing a good site
The back button is the button of doom. When they use that you’re losing them already, beware!
the best way to solve arguments is to have everyone watching users actually using the site @jmspool
There is no-one at #uxlondon who anyone would want a ‘user experience’ with. I would like to give them an experinece of my Klingon #gesture  
@leisa: the best links are 7-12 words in length #uxlondon > Knowledge to pass on!
@jmspool asks – if Domino’s Pizza has a 7% conversion then what on earth are the other 93% doing on the site? Window shopping!
Users are more likely to click the home link while on the home page than click to view the featured content. Crazy!
anyone who tells you that your homepage is for brand, to learn about your products/your business etc. They’re wrong
Homepage purpose – to get people to other pages, usually to a category page. Divide real estate accordingly
alphabetical order is the same as random order in 99% of cases
Don’t be afraid to imitate when learning (not copy) great app design. Remember those that imitated the master artists?
sketchbooks aren’t about being a good artist, they’re about being a good thinker
people do NOT learn the structure of your site by using it. They have no sense of the orgsn of ur site, nor do they care
people who choose a ‘Store’ page tend to never choose another ‘Store’ page in the same session
Store pages = groups of department pages. Helps users tell the system what they *don’t* want to see (eg. business or sports)
people type very generic terms into search – this is the main reason search fails (behaviour not technology)
RITE Method – Rapid Iterative Testing and Evaluation and formative v summative testing approaches
Department pages are for windowing, gallery pages are for selecting. Users get this.
“I’m hearing the @jmspool stuff from #uxlondon with a big fat “”it depends”” looming in my head. Anyone else the same?   “
users are telling you every day what trigger words they’re looking for and on what pages. Look at your search logs.
“Changes in the web don’t change the fundamentals of human behaviour”” (@jmspool)
content sucks the user towards it (this is why your content has to suck… like a vacuum cleaner)
humans = informavours  
nobody goes to a website without a purpose. except web designers
It appears @jmspool is giving the exact same talk right now at #uxlondon that I saw on a roadshow 5 years ago. Still holds true, I guess.
only if you have Uniquely Identified Content (like Amazon) do you get an exception to the searching = predictor of problems rule  you are *much* more likely to find what you’re looking for if you DON’T use search
pogosticking = when the user bounces between levels of the information hierarchy seeking their target content page
3 scent failure predictors: use of the back button, pogo-sticking, use of search
the back button is the button of doom (repeat after @jmspool)
wireframing 2.0 #uxlondon goodies http://tr.im/uxlondongoodies
I like using watercolour because it is less controlled, it forces you to work with mistakes
the no.1 thing that users base the quality of their experience on is whether or not they complete their task
Users seek content. The Target Content page is the daddy of all pages. We need to scent to get a user there via Gallery Pages
Want to learn HTML? try these http://bit.ly/Roryw http://bit.ly/VE7sj
Target Content Page = the page the user is looking for to solve their objective. The most important page on the site for that user
Wonderful. Stuck in toilet cubicle at #uxlondon. Just my luck. can someone help?
interactive wireframes have to be in their native environment
RE: links. Be direct. Guide users with purpose and clarity avoid … the mechanics of clicking http://bit.ly/eyub
The limitations of our sense of vision could be informing design more strongly  
good design is like air conditioning. You don’t notice it unless there’s something wrong
things that stop ppl frm scrolling: Design elements tht look like the bottom-white space, text tht looks like disclaimer
users look for blue & underlines. yes, it’s ugly and hard to see but we’ve trained users to look for that
what makes users confident – ‘i know where this link is going to take me’
you need to know – why are users coming to your site? what are their trigger words?
iceberg syndrome: people assume most important stuff is at top. If ‘marketing fluff’ is at top, don’t bother scrolling Book idea from #uxlondon Innovation Games: Creating Breakthrough Products and Services http://bit.ly/rHBFN
Navigation Graphics communicate scent. Content Graphics convey information. Ornamental Graphics do something else
the only people who care about what ‘section’ of a site something is in is people who manage the site. Users couldn’t care less   baseball – it’s 15mins of excitement jammed into 2.5hrs
homepages should look more like sitemaps in @jmspool’s opinion. It’s not clutter. Link rich homepages do better than sparse pages
cute/brand/marketing type links don’t work (mystery meat) [take note, clients! :)]
Keep scent by getting more and more specific. Go more general and you’ll lose the scent
Jared says the 3 click rule is ‘complete bullshit’. Tell your boss
short pages reduce scent. The best pages are *really* long. ref: CNN, Yahoo, Amazon, NYT
Re: invisible design: I do like it sometimes, but I love the heart stopping exasperation that amazing design gives me
Users don’t like to scroll? that’s more bullsh*t says @jmspool #uxlondon (via @Wandster) – It’s true, we’ve observed this for years now
Do lots. Diverge don’t converge
navigation panels are often scentless. Scent is specific, navigation is often not
Post-it easel pads http://bit.ly/94C6i
iceberg syndrome: people assume important stuff is at the top. If [that’s] ‘marketing fluff’, don’t bother scrolling
Pens are friends. Pencils will betray you
information masking: when users look at a page they focus on only the portion of the page that has consistently given them good use
The play-by-play is very informative
Studies show users can be equally happy with content that is 20 clicks away. Don’t quote that 3 click rule
most of the time BYOL (bring your own link) via search doesn’t work  
Following scent: ppl don’t mind clicking lots of links to find content *but* only if they feel that each click brings them closer
when the user comes to the page they scan for trigger words, if they find one, they click on it. If they don’t, they go to search
Room full of people hanging upside-down to prove your brain thinks light comes from the top of your head
the only time users complain about clicks is when the information scent has gone
Make your content suck! Learning from Jared Spool how links give off ‘scent’ and ‘suck’ people to content based on ‘trigger words
humans = informavours
Content must Suck, that is, content should Suck users towards it
Jared says: the best websites have a lot of content
Jared is talking about the Scent of Information and why it is more effective than designing for navigation
Laundry process masterpiece from sketching workshop by don norman, myself and another guy http://twitpic.com/7jdon
your bellybutton very important for vertical lines. It’s like a visual landmark. Pull the lines toward it  
#uxlondon good. but locks in toilets turn wrong way. towel dispenser invisible. and too high for kids. stair keeps tripping me.
haven’t heard the words ‘social media’ once at #uxlondon – lets keep it that way
Designers can influence business strategy. Business can benefit from design insights
693. Luke is teaching us how to bullshit our managers with random Power Point slides! Ninja cat effect!  
Pencils Before Pixels
i need to observe and draw people more (plain and simple)
can’t help feel the future is search-based though. Who really wants to categorise stuff?
“How do you draw a blur?”” (thumb, B pencil and watercolour would be my answer)    “
The Don: ‘How do you draw a blur?’ Mark: ‘You lick your page’  
if notation is aimed at recording, diagramming is aimed at explaining  
tips for explanatory mapping & diagramming: balance style and substance, think about how to direct attention where you want it   style v substance – think about who your audience is
infographics: honest quality best – avoid slick
showing people your sucky drawings is part of the growing process
good method for drawing figures (thanks Mark Baskinger)
Bill: I like using watercolour because it is less controlled, it forces you to work with mistakes
plan before you sketch  
moving onto visualising functional relationships – communicating how things interact together so it makes sense to others
there is no necessarily right way to categorise content, though there are a few wrong ways
people really do organise their bookshelves by colour  
i can recommend Trio Scribli pens #uxlondon (via @solle) oops Trio Scribbi http://bit.ly/XCzaL
more notational sketching tips: respect the borders (esp. the gutter), print neatly (annotations), white space is ok
notational sketching tips: fast & loose, use icons, images & symbols, portability is important (in context), date your pages
analysing visual input (what you see) and deciding what to record is a particular kind of drawing skill
notational sketching = the act of recording things that you see in the world. Mostly for your sketchbook, less so for sharing if you have an element in your sketch that is weak or less deliberate, it attracts attention & detracts from your entire sketch The only people who care about balance in a sitemap are the IAs, users just want to find the information they need
sketching is physical thought in my book
sketching becomes a magic trick. I can draw this and you can’t. That’s a powerful thing
i agree. you can’t copy and paste sketched wireframes. I think that’s incredibly important
these are all ‘ungood’ ways of drawing a circle
i can recommend Trio Scribli pens
move the point of your arrow back just a tiny bit off centre and it will look better
build your sketches up sequentially, add weight and tone onto the skeleton
avoid crosshatching in wireframes, starts to ‘pop’ too much. Use various weight of diagonal or vertical lines instead sketchiness = this is not a finished idea, I’m still thinking about this. Sketching holds the conversation back to the big picture
if you can’t see the tip of your pencil you can’t draw
carry a sketchbook all the time. practice sketching all the time. practice straight lines, squares, using hatching for tone
techniques for better hand drawn wireframes: use non-repro blue for underlay drawing (it disappears when copied)
you have to warm up before you can sketch properly
ok this is nuts. people have paid over a grand to sit in a room and get taught how to sketch?
of course I’m participating! my vertical lines are much better than my horizontal  
(feels like sketch pilates)
Pencils Before Pixels
thinking is a fast paced activity, the pencil is simple & immediate, a good, fast tool for capturing thought
why are we here (in this sketching workshop)? to become better communicators
how many of you guys are IxDs? And how many are UX Designers?’ Cue chaos  
sketching workshop kicking off, hooray! ‘and we’re going to get kind of sweaty’
Apple Human Interface Guidelines – great insight into how apple design interfaces – http://bit.ly/M4GGY
Too simple is boring. To complex is frustrating. There’s an ideal amount. Experience moves the preferred complexity up
#thedon – In Favour of Complexity http://tinyurl.com/n2u3vp (via @bogiezero) #uxlondon (thx again @lukew)
Decorating’ data rather than using web design to provide better user access is dangerous
Complexity is not bad. Complicated is bad
Despite getting called out by Don Norman, I stand by the fact that very few people customize Web pages
Very cool….just watched Don Norman and Luke Wroblewski have a conversation about Yahoo and Google
As I get better at something, I need increased complexity to maintain interest, otherwise I get bored
Quote of the day ‘I know what every individual word in the paragraph means but when you put them in that order I don’t understand’
we say we want simplicity but we buy things because they’ve got more features
The reason the ipod is such a success is that it is a complete system. License music + iTunes + iPod
But the Graphical User Interface does not scale
Google’s advanced search interfaces helps me do something complex in a supported way and starts to teach me Boolean search
People with messy offices are often better at finding materials  
You can contain complexity by putting things in modular clumps so you only see options when you need them
And attendees of @uxlondon were unfortunate to miss ‘Shaping the Future of Mixed Plastics’ which clashed http://tinyurl.com/m5fu5t Shame…
So true: Simple things can be complex. Complex things can be understandable. Complexity isn’t simply Complicatedness. #uxlondon #donnorman
“Reading “”101 Things I Learned in Architecture School”” by Matthew Frederick, per @lukewdesign’s recommendation @ #uxlondon.
Shattered after UX London. Must have drawn 50 planed arrows since yesterday
In Jared Spool’s workshop at #uxlondon. Reminds me of Bible verse – There is nothing new under the sun
Yip, that’s my slump from UXLondon high complete … now back down to earth…
@UXlondon one thing to improve on, albeit nothing to do with the actual event, you need a back-network-styled website so people can connect.
“Some do, but others are happy with sketches. Learnt at #uxlondon: “”All you really need is a picture and a conversation.”
RT @odannyboy: My #uxlondon slides from my workshop http://is.gd/15b3Z and presentation http://is.gd/15b4G are up on Slideshare
@leisa slides for her #uxlondon workshop are now on slideshare (http://bit.ly/1IfSvQ)
Back in the office after #UXLondon {sigh} … where do I begin?!
fjordaan If you missed yesterday’s tweetstorm, my #uxlondon summary is up on our blog http://is.gd/158XD
@uxlondon will be pulling stuff together and there will also be a redux of the whole thing in various forms.
anti-patterns’ http://bit.ly/17yCa #uxlondon
@pocopina haven’t heard the words ‘social media’ once at #uxlondon – lets keep it that way 🙂
Back at work after #uxlondon. A pile of business cards and receipts on my desk is slowly forming into a semblance of order.  #uxlondon – had a great time and really enjoyed the talks and meeting all the UX folks. Time to process the inbox…
Sketches are a very powerful tool, much more so if you master your medium. #uxlondon – Sketching is key to the design process.
Number 41 of my UX methods trading cards is missing. Help. Help. #uxlondon
Disappointed at @jmspool workshop: learned these truths 7yrs ago. Easy targets and Jakob-like dogmatism. #uxlondon
@jmspool really enjoyed your workshop at uxlondon… stuff i kinda knew but great to get true confirmation
@UXlondon @cennydd is running his workshop in an agile fashion. People are playing planning poker to decide what to cover!
Great way to finish #uxlondon; a drink with @clagnut with a discussion of font embedding, Silverback and Agile/UX. UX geekout is complete.  
there’s a usability conference going on in London – someone I follow is tweeting from that rubbish from there #UXLondon
hoping to find something to provoke my enthusiasm in the way uxlondon has done for yours. Sounds like a great event
Remarkable observation from Maggie Hanley:no English speakers & all the woman presenters at #uxlondon were Australian.
Wish there were 3 of me so I could have seen everything or just had enough brain to absorb it all!  
Enjoying wi-fi on train home from #uxlondon – Nowhere near O’Reilly #railsconf standards, but Jared Spool and @lukewdesign rocked!
Wireframes 2.0 validated the path I’m on, but dare I go the final step and abandon paper altogether? On some projects, yes. @odannyboy’s brainstorming workshop certainly made us think, but IMO doesn’t answer trickiest thing: how to reach consensus.   Disappointed at @jmspool workshop: learned these truths 7yrs ago. Easy targets and Jakob-like dogmatism. Also, uninteractive. #uxlondon
Conference highlight presentation from Don Norman, starting with apparent heresy: Complexity is not a problem. Complicated is.   Design as activity, not artifact. Designer as facilitator, not rockstar. Start from experience, not system @peterme
Intuitive = reducing target knowledge; subtly increasing current knowledge
Architecture learnings. Parti = guiding concept for design decisions
Enjoy your cut ‘n paste, folks. I’ll enjoy my evening of free beer and birthday fun. #uxlondon #priorities
2 options for survey: ‘No thanks’ and ‘Do survey later’. Think they need a Plan B.
In fact I’d even go so far as to say that #uxlondon has reconfirmed my love for what I do and that the future of UX is very bright indeed
@cennydd on agile: distributed teams do not work. Yup, got experience with that!
“quote of #uxlondon? (by retweet volume)””You could look at what your competitors are doing. That way you can always be one step behind them””
@cennydd being railroaded into writing book about Agile UX by audience 🙂
Watching @jmspool take down the m&s site live, funny end to #uxlondon
design research: discussion guide – start as wide as possible, narrow slowly
“””you must be stupid, you got three stupid users”” client response when first watching a lab usability test @leisa”
Everyone loves doing design work, and everybody can do design, with collaboration/facilitation. My main take-away, I think.
the most striking truth of the curve is that zero users give zero insights (JN – final one of @leisa ‘s presentation)
“””the most important brand message is task completion”” says @jmspool
“””even the smallest amount of data beats none”” (JN)
Users don’t think in sections – developers do.
Scent Depends on Context: Generic links at the bottom of the page are contextless.
a suitable time to remind anyone who missed it of Marrying Web Analytics and User Experience http://bit.ly/Jduw3
….don’t be afraid of getting a bit creative (@leisa) #uxlondon  
Is it worth the resources put in to create decorative graphics if you haven’t got the content right?
self reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behaviour (JN)  
” 205. Mesquaresmall_normal Mark_Stringer RT @rapella “”our brains just don’t work the way we think they do”” (@leisa) #uxlondon thx @solle 2 days ago from web    “
“””our brains just don’t work the way we think they do”” (@leisa)
when to do design research? I say it never stops
design research will get you empathetic ‘to solve a problem you must first understand it’ (Kim Goodwin)
“Search is users creating their own links. They type in the trigger word they were expecting. “”Bring your own link””
great mixture of people in this workshop from many different places and job types
@leisa asking everyone their names and 3 tags that describe them
Force writing: Come up with 2 words that are opposites and figure how they can work with the problem
#UXLondon is like sending the creative half of your brain to a gymnasium for days. Really enjoyable stuff.
I really am the only person here without an iPhone and a Mac
Ux mgmt. Key to growth and impact is to increase reputation. But how does one measure that?
Lots of shoes being waved in the air in this morning workshop with Eric Reiss.
the word ideation impresses clients
Excited about sketching workshop at #uxlondon. Won’t be tweeting, it’s pen time 🙂 pencil, then pen time (practiceyourgrip
If you have a good experience you will tell three friends. If you are an unhappy customer, you will tell 17 people
When users comparison-shop using pogostick techniques: purchase=11% . Compare to 55% using product lists
@lukewdesign: All my notes from #uxlondon today: http://www.lukew.com/ff/archive.asp
lukewdesign Left the pub to go hear design talks in a loft. What’s wrong with me?
@odannyboy workshop summary: Collaboratively sketch concepts rapidly and without fear. Quantity first. Refine and define later.
workshop summary: home pages should look more like site maps
Who will they invite next year: Alan Cooper, Jacob Nielsen and JJ Garrett? Tough deal to beat this lineup.
if your team succeeds all the time, then fire them. They’re not trying hard enough. Bill Buxton
@leisa: When users comparison-shop using pogostick techniques: purchase=11% . Compare to 55% using product lists
Another good day at #uxlondon. Not sure I agree with a couple of things @jmspool said however hard to argue with his real user testing stats
Learned how to draw a circle in UX London – put your pinky on the page and have a couple of practice gos in the air first
if you’re not spending time watching people use your site there is no way you’re designing a good site
The back button is the button of doom. When they use that you’re losing them already, beware!
the best way to solve arguments is to have everyone watching users actually using the site @jmspool
There is no-one at #uxlondon who anyone would want a ‘user experience’ with. I would like to give them an experinece of my Klingon #gesture  
@leisa: the best links are 7-12 words in length #uxlondon > Knowledge to pass on!
@jmspool asks – if Domino’s Pizza has a 7% conversion then what on earth are the other 93% doing on the site? Window shopping!
Users are more likely to click the home link while on the home page than click to view the featured content. Crazy!
anyone who tells you that your homepage is for brand, to learn about your products/your business etc. They’re wrong
Homepage purpose – to get people to other pages, usually to a category page. Divide real estate accordingly
alphabetical order is the same as random order in 99% of cases
Don’t be afraid to imitate when learning (not copy) great app design. Remember those that imitated the master artists?
sketchbooks aren’t about being a good artist, they’re about being a good thinker
people do NOT learn the structure of your site by using it. They have no sense of the orgsn of ur site, nor do they care
people who choose a ‘Store’ page tend to never choose another ‘Store’ page in the same session
Store pages = groups of department pages. Helps users tell the system what they *don’t* want to see (eg. business or sports)
people type very generic terms into search – this is the main reason search fails (behaviour not technology)
RITE Method – Rapid Iterative Testing and Evaluation and formative v summative testing approaches
Department pages are for windowing, gallery pages are for selecting. Users get this.
“I’m hearing the @jmspool stuff from #uxlondon with a big fat “”it depends”” looming in my head. Anyone else the same?   “
users are telling you every day what trigger words they’re looking for and on what pages. Look at your search logs.
“Changes in the web don’t change the fundamentals of human behaviour”” (@jmspool)
content sucks the user towards it (this is why your content has to suck… like a vacuum cleaner)
humans = informavours  
nobody goes to a website without a purpose. except web designers
It appears @jmspool is giving the exact same talk right now at #uxlondon that I saw on a roadshow 5 years ago. Still holds true, I guess.
only if you have Uniquely Identified Content (like Amazon) do you get an exception to the searching = predictor of problems rule  you are *much* more likely to find what you’re looking for if you DON’T use search
pogosticking = when the user bounces between levels of the information hierarchy seeking their target content page
3 scent failure predictors: use of the back button, pogo-sticking, use of search
the back button is the button of doom (repeat after @jmspool)
wireframing 2.0 #uxlondon goodies http://tr.im/uxlondongoodies
I like using watercolour because it is less controlled, it forces you to work with mistakes
the no.1 thing that users base the quality of their experience on is whether or not they complete their task
Users seek content. The Target Content page is the daddy of all pages. We need to scent to get a user there via Gallery Pages
Want to learn HTML? try these http://bit.ly/Roryw http://bit.ly/VE7sj
Target Content Page = the page the user is looking for to solve their objective. The most important page on the site for that user
Wonderful. Stuck in toilet cubicle at #uxlondon. Just my luck. can someone help?
interactive wireframes have to be in their native environment
RE: links. Be direct. Guide users with purpose and clarity avoid … the mechanics of clicking http://bit.ly/eyub
The limitations of our sense of vision could be informing design more strongly  
good design is like air conditioning. You don’t notice it unless there’s something wrong
things that stop ppl frm scrolling: Design elements tht look like the bottom-white space, text tht looks like disclaimer
users look for blue & underlines. yes, it’s ugly and hard to see but we’ve trained users to look for that.
what makes users confident – ‘i know where this link is going to take me’
you need to know – why are users coming to your site? what are their trigger words?
iceberg syndrome: people assume most important stuff is at top. If ‘marketing fluff’ is at top, don’t bother scrolling Book idea from #uxlondon Innovation Games: Creating Breakthrough Products and Services http://bit.ly/rHBFN

And attendees of @uxlondon were unfortunate to miss ‘Shaping the Future of Mixed Plastics’ which clashed http://tinyurl.com/m5fu5t Shame…  

New blog post reviewing #uxlondon http://www.whiteoctober.co.uk/blog/2009/06/19/uxlondon/  

So true: Simple things can be complex. Complex things can be understandable. Complexity isn’t simply Complicatedness.

“Reading “”101 Things I Learned in Architecture School”” by Matthew Frederick, per @lukewdesign’s recommendation

Shattered after UX London. Must have drawn 50 planed arrows since yesterday

In Jared Spool’s workshop at #uxlondon. Reminds me of Bible verse – There is nothing new under the sun

Yip, that’s my slump from UXLondon high complete … now back down to earth…  

@UXlondon one thing to improve on, albeit nothing to do with the actual event, you need a back-network-styled website so people can connect.

“Some do, but others are happy with sketches. Learnt at #uxlondon: “”All you really need is a picture and a conversation.””  “

RT @odannyboy: My #uxlondon slides from my workshop http://is.gd/15b3Z and presentation http://is.gd/15b4G are up on Slideshare

@leisa slides for her #uxlondon workshop are now on slideshare (http://bit.ly/1IfSvQ )

Back in the office after #UXLondon {sigh} … where do I begin?!

fjordaan If you missed yesterday’s tweetstorm, my #uxlondon summary is up on our blog http://is.gd/158XD

@uxlondon will be pulling stuff together and there will also be a redux of the whole thing in various forms.

anti-patterns’ http://bit.ly/17yCa #uxlondon

@pocopina haven’t heard the words ‘social media’ once at #uxlondon – lets keep it that way 🙂

Back at work after #uxlondon. A pile of business cards and receipts on my desk is slowly forming into a semblance of order.

#uxlondon – had a great time and really enjoyed the talks and meeting all the UX folks. Time to process the inbox…

Sketches are a very powerful tool, much more so if you master your medium. #uxlondon – Sketching is key to the design process.

Number 41 of my UX methods trading cards is missing. Help. Help. #uxlondon

Disappointed at @jmspool workshop: learned these truths 7yrs ago. Easy targets and Jakob-like dogmatism. #uxlondon

@jmspool really enjoyed your workshop at uxlondon… stuff i kinda knew but great to get true confirmation.

@UXlondon @cennydd is running his workshop in an agile fashion. People are playing planning poker to decide what to cover!

Great way to finish #uxlondon; a drink with @clagnut with a discussion of font embedding, Silverback and Agile/UX. UX geekout is complete.  

there’s a usability conference going on in London – someone I follow is tweeting from that rubbish from there #UXLondon

hoping to find something to provoke my enthusiasm in the way uxlondon has done for yours. Sounds like a great event

Remarkable observation from Maggie Hanley:no English speakers & all the woman presenters at #uxlondon were Australian.

Wish there were 3 of me so I could have seen everything or just had enough brain to absorb it all!

Enjoying wi-fi on train home from #uxlondon – Nowhere near O’Reilly #railsconf standards, but Jared Spool and @lukewdesign rocked!

Wireframes 2.0 validated the path I’m on, but dare I go the final step and abandon paper altogether? On some projects, yes.

@odannyboy’s brainstorming workshop certainly made us think, but IMO doesn’t answer trickiest thing: how to reach consensus.

Disappointed at @jmspool workshop: learned these truths 7yrs ago. Easy targets and Jakob-like dogmatism. Also, uninteractive. #uxlondon

Conference highlight presentation from Don Norman, starting with apparent heresy: Complexity is not a problem. Complicated is.   Design as activity, not artifact. Designer as facilitator, not rockstar. Start from experience, not system @peterme

Intuitive = reducing target knowledge; subtly increasing current knowledge

Architecture learnings. Parti = guiding concept for design decisions

Enjoy your cut ‘n paste, folks. I’ll enjoy my evening of free beer and birthday fun. #uxlondon #priorities

2 options for survey: ‘No thanks’ and ‘Do survey later’. Think they need a Plan B.

In fact I’d even go so far as to say that #uxlondon has reconfirmed my love for what I do and that the future of UX is very bright indeed.

@cennydd on agile: distributed teams do not work. Yup, got experience with that!

“quote of #uxlondon? (by retweet volume)””You could look at what your competitors are doing. That way you can always be one step behind them

@cennydd being railroaded into writing book about Agile UX by audience 🙂

Watching @jmspool take down the m&s site live, funny end to #uxlondon

design research: discussion guide – start as wide as possible, narrow slowly

you must be stupid, you got three stupid users”” client response when first watching a lab usability test @leisa”

Everyone loves doing design work, and everybody can do design, with collaboration/facilitation. My main take-away, I think.

the most striking truth of the curve is that zero users give zero insights (JN – final one of @leisa ‘s presentation)

the most important brand message is task completion”” says @jmspool”

even the smallest amount of data beats none”” (JN)

Users don’t think in sections – developers do.

Scent Depends on Context: Generic links at the bottom of the page are contextless.

a suitable time to remind anyone who missed it of Marrying Web Analytics and User Experience http://bit.ly/Jduw3

….don’t be afraid of getting a bit creative (@leisa) #uxlondon  

Is it worth the resources put in to create decorative graphics if you haven’t got the content right?

self reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behaviour (JN)  

” 205. Mesquaresmall_normal Mark_Stringer RT @rapella “”our brains just don’t work the way we think they do”” (@leisa) #uxlondon thx @solle 2 days ago from web    ”

“””our brains just don’t work the way we think they do”” (@leisa)

when to do design research? I say it never stops

design research will get you empathetic ‘to solve a problem you must first understand it’ (Kim Goodwin)

“Search is users creating their own links. They type in the trigger word they were expecting. “”Bring your own link”

great mixture of people in this workshop from many different places and job types

@leisa asking everyone their names and 3 tags that describe them

Force writing: Come up with 2 words that are opposites and figure how they can work with the problem

#UXLondon is like sending the creative half of your brain to a gymnasium for days. Really enjoyable stuff.

I really am the only person here without an iPhone and a Mac.

Ux mgmt. Key to growth and impact is to increase reputation. But how does one measure that?

Lots of shoes being waved in the air in this morning workshop with Eric Reiss.

the word ideation impresses clients

Excited about sketching workshop at #uxlondon. Won’t be tweeting, it’s pen time 🙂 pencil, then pen time (practiceyourgrip)

If you have a good experience you will tell three friends. If you are an unhappy customer, you will tell 17 people

When users comparison-shop using pogostick techniques: purchase=11% . Compare to 55% using product lists.

@lukewdesign: All my notes from #uxlondon today: http://www.lukew.com/ff/archive.asp

lukewdesign Left the pub to go hear design talks in a loft. What’s wrong with me?

@odannyboy workshop summary: Collaboratively sketch concepts rapidly and without fear. Quantity first. Refine and define later.

workshop summary: home pages should look more like site maps

Who will they invite next year: Alan Cooper, Jacob Nielsen and JJ Garrett? Tough deal to beat this lineup

if your team succeeds all the time, then fire them. They’re not trying hard enough. Bill Buxton

@leisa: When users comparison-shop using pogostick techniques: purchase=11% . Compare to 55% using product lists

Another good day at #uxlondon. Not sure I agree with a couple of things @jmspool said however hard to argue with his real user testing stats

Learned how to draw a circle in UX London – put your pinky on the page and have a couple of practice gos in the air first

if you’re not spending time watching people use your site there is no way you’re designing a good site

The back button is the button of doom. When they use that you’re losing them already, beware!

the best way to solve arguments is to have everyone watching users actually using the site @jmspool

There is no-one at #uxlondon who anyone would want a ‘user experience’ with. I would like to give them an experinece of my Klingon #gesture  

@leisa: the best links are 7-12 words in length #uxlondon > Knowledge to pass on!

@jmspool asks – if Domino’s Pizza has a 7% conversion then what on earth are the other 93% doing on the site? Window shopping!

Users are more likely to click the home link while on the home page than click to view the featured content. Crazy!

anyone who tells you that your homepage is for brand, to learn about your products/your business etc. They’re wrong

Homepage purpose – to get people to other pages, usually to a category page. Divide real estate accordingly

alphabetical order is the same as random order in 99% of cases

Don’t be afraid to imitate when learning (not copy) great app design. Remember those that imitated the master artists?

sketchbooks aren’t about being a good artist, they’re about being a good thinker

people do NOT learn the structure of your site by using it. They have no sense of the orgsn of ur site, nor do they care

people who choose a ‘Store’ page tend to never choose another ‘Store’ page in the same session

Store pages = groups of department pages. Helps users tell the system what they *don’t* want to see (eg. business or sports)

people type very generic terms into search – this is the main reason search fails (behaviour not technology)

RITE Method – Rapid Iterative Testing and Evaluation and formative v summative testing approaches

Department pages are for windowing, gallery pages are for selecting. Users get this.

“I’m hearing the @jmspool stuff from #uxlondon with a big fat “”it depends”” looming in my head. Anyone else the same?   “

users are telling you every day what trigger words they’re looking for and on what pages. Look at your search logs.

“Changes in the web don’t change the fundamentals of human behaviour”” (@jmspool)

content sucks the user towards it (this is why your content has to suck… like a vacuum cleaner)

humans = informavours  

nobody goes to a website without a purpose. except web designers

It appears @jmspool is giving the exact same talk right now at #uxlondon that I saw on a roadshow 5 years ago. Still holds true, I guess.

only if you have Uniquely Identified Content (like Amazon) do you get an exception to the searching = predictor of problems rule  you are *much* more likely to find what you’re looking for if you DON’T use search

pogosticking = when the user bounces between levels of the information hierarchy seeking their target content page

3 scent failure predictors: use of the back button, pogo-sticking, use of search

the back button is the button of doom (repeat after @jmspool)

wireframing 2.0 #uxlondon goodies http://tr.im/uxlondongoodies

I like using watercolour because it is less controlled, it forces you to work with mistakes

the no.1 thing that users base the quality of their experience on is whether or not they complete their task

Users seek content. The Target Content page is the daddy of all pages. We need to scent to get a user there via Gallery Pages

Want to learn HTML? try these http://bit.ly/Roryw http://bit.ly/VE7sj

Target Content Page = the page the user is looking for to solve their objective. The most important page on the site for that user

Wonderful. Stuck in toilet cubicle at #uxlondon. Just my luck. can someone help?

interactive wireframes have to be in their native environment

RE: links. Be direct. Guide users with purpose and clarity avoid … the mechanics of clicking http://bit.ly/eyub

The limitations of our sense of vision could be informing design more strongly  

good design is like air conditioning. You don’t notice it unless there’s something wrong

things that stop ppl frm scrolling: Design elements tht look like the bottom-white space, text tht looks like disclaimer

users look for blue & underlines. yes, it’s ugly and hard to see but we’ve trained users to look for that

what makes users confident – ‘i know where this link is going to take me’

you need to know – why are users coming to your site? what are their trigger words?

iceberg syndrome: people assume most important stuff is at top. If ‘marketing fluff’ is at top, don’t bother scrolling Book idea from #uxlondon Innovation Games: Creating Breakthrough Products and Services http://bit.ly/rHBFN

Navigation Graphics communicate scent. Content Graphics convey information. Ornamental Graphics do something else

the only people who care about what ‘section’ of a site something is in is people who manage the site. Users couldn’t care less   baseball – it’s 15mins of excitement jammed into 2.5hrs

homepages should look more like sitemaps in @jmspool’s opinion. It’s not clutter. Link rich homepages do better than sparse pages

cute/brand/marketing type links don’t work (mystery meat) [take note, clients! :)]

Keep scent by getting more and more specific. Go more general and you’ll lose the scent

Jared says the 3 click rule is ‘complete bullshit’. Tell your boss

short pages reduce scent. The best pages are *really* long. ref: CNN, Yahoo, Amazon, NYT

Re: invisible design: I do like it sometimes, but I love the heart stopping exasperation that amazing design gives me

Users don’t like to scroll? that’s more bullsh*t says @jmspool #uxlondon (via @Wandster) – It’s true, we’ve observed this for years now

Do lots. Diverge don’t converge

navigation panels are often scentless. Scent is specific, navigation is often not

Post-it easel pads http://bit.ly/94C6i

iceberg syndrome: people assume important stuff is at the top. If [that’s] ‘marketing fluff’, don’t bother scrolling

Pens are friends. Pencils will betray you

information masking: when users look at a page they focus on only the portion of the page that has consistently given them good use

The play-by-play is very informative

Studies show users can be equally happy with content that is 20 clicks away. Don’t quote that 3 click rule

most of the time BYOL (bring your own link) via search doesn’t work  

Following scent: ppl don’t mind clicking lots of links to find content *but* only if they feel that each click brings them closer

when the user comes to the page they scan for trigger words, if they find one, they click on it. If they don’t, they go to search

Room full of people hanging upside-down to prove your brain thinks light comes from the top of your head

the only time users complain about clicks is when the information scent has gone

Make your content suck! Learning from Jared Spool how links give off ‘scent’ and ‘suck’ people to content based on ‘trigger words

humans = informavours

Content must Suck, that is, content should Suck users towards it

Jared says: the best websites have a lot of content

Jared is talking about the Scent of Information and why it is more effective than designing for navigation

Laundry process masterpiece from sketching workshop by don norman, myself and another guy http://twitpic.com/7jdon

your bellybutton very important for vertical lines. It’s like a visual landmark. Pull the lines toward it  

#uxlondon good. but locks in toilets turn wrong way. towel dispenser invisible. and too high for kids. stair keeps tripping me.

haven’t heard the words ‘social media’ once at #uxlondon – lets keep it that way

Designers can influence business strategy. Business can benefit from design insights

693. Luke is teaching us how to bullshit our managers with random Power Point slides! Ninja cat effect!  

Pencils Before Pixels

i need to observe and draw people more (plain and simple)

can’t help feel the future is search-based though. Who really wants to categorise stuff?

“How do you draw a blur?”” (thumb, B pencil and watercolour would be my answer)    “

The Don: ‘How do you draw a blur?’ Mark: ‘You lick your page’  

if notation is aimed at recording, diagramming is aimed at explaining  

tips for explanatory mapping & diagramming: balance style and substance, think about how to direct attention where you want it   style v substance – think about who your audience is

infographics: honest quality best – avoid slick

showing people your sucky drawings is part of the growing process

good method for drawing figures (thanks Mark Baskinger)

Bill: I like using watercolour because it is less controlled, it forces you to work with mistakes

plan before you sketch  

moving onto visualising functional relationships – communicating how things interact together so it makes sense to others

there is no necessarily right way to categorise content, though there are a few wrong ways

people really do organise their bookshelves by colour  

i can recommend Trio Scribli pens #uxlondon (via @solle) oops Trio Scribbi http://bit.ly/XCzaL

more notational sketching tips: respect the borders (esp. the gutter), print neatly (annotations), white space is ok

notational sketching tips: fast & loose, use icons, images & symbols, portability is important (in context), date your pages

analysing visual input (what you see) and deciding what to record is a particular kind of drawing skill

notational sketching = the act of recording things that you see in the world.

Mostly for your sketchbook, less so for sharing

if you have an element in your sketch that is weak or less deliberate, it attracts attention & detracts from your entire sketch

The only people who care about balance in a sitemap are the IAs, users just want to find the information they need

sketching is physical thought in my book

sketching becomes a magic trick. I can draw this and you can’t. That’s a powerful thing

i agree. you can’t copy and paste sketched wireframes. I think that’s incredibly important

these are all ‘ungood’ ways of drawing a circle

i can recommend Trio Scribli pens

move the point of your arrow back just a tiny bit off centre and it will look better

build your sketches up sequentially, add weight and tone onto the skeleton

avoid crosshatching in wireframes, starts to ‘pop’ too much. Use various weight of diagonal or vertical lines instead sketchiness = this is not a finished idea, I’m still thinking about this. Sketching holds the conversation back to the big picture

if you can’t see the tip of your pencil you can’t draw

carry a sketchbook all the time. practice sketching all the time. practice straight lines, squares, using hatching for tone

techniques for better hand drawn wireframes: use non-repro blue for underlay drawing (it disappears when copied)

you have to warm up before you can sketch properly

ok this is nuts. people have paid over a grand to sit in a room and get taught how to sketch?

of course I’m participating! my vertical lines are much better than my horizontal  

(feels like sketch pilates)

Pencils Before Pixels

thinking is a fast paced activity, the pencil is simple & immediate, a good, fast tool for capturing thought

why are we here (in this sketching workshop)? to become better communicators

how many of you guys are IxDs? And how many are UX Designers?’ Cue chaos  

sketching workshop kicking off, hooray! ‘and we’re going to get kind of sweaty’

Apple Human Interface Guidelines – great insight into how apple design interfaces – http://bit.ly/M4GGY

Too simple is boring. To complex is frustrating. There’s an ideal amount. Experience moves the preferred complexity up

#thedon – In Favour of Complexity http://tinyurl.com/n2u3vp (via @bogiezero) #uxlondon (thx again @lukew)

Decorating’ data rather than using web design to provide better user access is dangerous

Complexity is not bad. Complicated is bad

Despite getting called out by Don Norman, I stand by the fact that very few people customize Web pages

Very cool….just watched Don Norman and Luke Wroblewski have a conversation about Yahoo and Google

As I get better at something, I need increased complexity to maintain interest, otherwise I get bored

Quote of the day ‘I know what every individual word in the paragraph means but when you put them in that order I don’t understand’

we say we want simplicity but we buy things because they’ve got more features

The reason the ipod is such a success is that it is a complete system. License music + iTunes + iPod

But the Graphical User Interface does not scale

Google’s advanced search interfaces helps me do something complex in a supported way and starts to teach me Boolean search

People with messy offices are often better at finding materials  

You can contain complexity by putting things in modular clumps so you only see options when you need them

And attendees of @uxlondon were unfortunate to miss ‘Shaping the Future of Mixed Plastics’ which clashed http://tinyurl.com/m5fu5t Shame…

New blog post reviewing #uxlondon http://www.whiteoctober.co.uk/blog/2009/06/19/uxlondon/

So true: Simple things can be complex. Complex things can be understandable. Complexity isn’t simply Complicatedness. #uxlondon #donnorman

“Reading “”101 Things I Learned in Architecture School”” by Matthew Frederick, per @lukewdesign’s recommendation @ #uxlondon.

Shattered after UX London. Must have drawn 50 planed arrows since yesterday

In Jared Spool’s workshop at #uxlondon. Reminds me of Bible verse – There is nothing new under the sun

Yip, that’s my slump from UXLondon high complete … now back down to earth…

@UXlondon one thing to improve on, albeit nothing to do with the actual event, you need a back-network-styled website so people can connect.

“Some do, but others are happy with sketches. Learnt at #uxlondon: “”All you really need is a picture and a conversation.”

RT @odannyboy: My #uxlondon slides from my workshop http://is.gd/15b3Z and presentation http://is.gd/15b4G are up on Slideshare

@leisa slides for her #uxlondon workshop are now on slideshare (http://bit.ly/1IfSvQ)

Back in the office after #UXLondon {sigh} … where do I begin?!

fjordaan If you missed yesterday’s tweetstorm, my #uxlondon summary is up on our blog http://is.gd/158XD

@uxlondon will be pulling stuff together and there will also be a redux of the whole thing in various forms.

anti-patterns’ http://bit.ly/17yCa #uxlondon

@pocopina haven’t heard the words ‘social media’ once at #uxlondon – lets keep it that way 🙂

Sketches are a very powerful tool, much more so if you master your medium. #uxlondon – Sketching is key to the design process.

Number 41 of my UX methods trading cards is missing. Help. Help. #uxlondon

Disappointed at @jmspool workshop: learned these truths 7yrs ago. Easy targets and Jakob-like dogmatism. #uxlondon

@jmspool really enjoyed your workshop at uxlondon… stuff i kinda knew but great to get true confirmation

@UXlondon @cennydd is running his workshop in an agile fashion. People are playing planning poker to decide what to cover!

Great way to finish #uxlondon; a drink with @clagnut with a discussion of font embedding, Silverback and Agile/UX. UX geekout is complete.  

there’s a usability conference going on in London – someone I follow is tweeting from that rubbish from there #UXLondon

hoping to find something to provoke my enthusiasm in the way uxlondon has done for yours. Sounds like a great event

Remarkable observation from Maggie Hanley:no English speakers & all the woman presenters at #uxlondon were Australian.

Wish there were 3 of me so I could have seen everything or just had enough brain to absorb it all!  

Enjoying wi-fi on train home from #uxlondon – Nowhere near O’Reilly #railsconf standards, but Jared Spool and @lukewdesign rocked!

Wireframes 2.0 validated the path I’m on, but dare I go the final step and abandon paper altogether? On some projects, yes.

@odannyboy’s brainstorming workshop certainly made us think, but IMO doesn’t answer trickiest thing: how to reach consensus.

Disappointed at @jmspool workshop: learned these truths 7yrs ago. Easy targets and Jakob-like dogmatism. Also, uninteractive. #uxlondon

Conference highlight presentation from Don Norman, starting with apparent heresy: Complexity is not a problem. Complicated is.

Design as activity, not artifact. Designer as facilitator, not rockstar. Start from experience, not system @peterme

Intuitive = reducing target knowledge; subtly increasing current knowledge

Architecture learnings. Parti = guiding concept for design decisions

Enjoy your cut ‘n paste, folks. I’ll enjoy my evening of free beer and birthday fun. #uxlondon #priorities

2 options for survey: ‘No thanks’ and ‘Do survey later’. Think they need a Plan B.

In fact I’d even go so far as to say that #uxlondon has reconfirmed my love for what I do and that the future of UX is very bright indeed

@cennydd on agile: distributed teams do not work. Yup, got experience with that!

“quote of #uxlondon? (by retweet volume)””You could look at what your competitors are doing. That way you can always be one step behind them””

@cennydd being railroaded into writing book about Agile UX by audience 🙂

Watching @jmspool take down the m&s site live, funny end to #uxlondon

design research: discussion guide – start as wide as possible, narrow slowly

“you must be stupid, you got three stupid users” client response when first watching a lab usability test @leisa”

Everyone loves doing design work, and everybody can do design, with collaboration/facilitation. My main take-away, I think.

the most striking truth of the curve is that zero users give zero insights (JN – final one of @leisa ‘s presentation)

“the most important brand message is task completion” says @jmspool

“even the smallest amount of data beats none” (JN)

Users don’t think in sections – developers do.

Scent Depends on Context: Generic links at the bottom of the page are contextless.

a suitable time to remind anyone who missed it of Marrying Web Analytics and User Experience http://bit.ly/Jduw3

….don’t be afraid of getting a bit creative (@leisa) #uxlondon  

Is it worth the resources put in to create decorative graphics if you haven’t got the content right?

self reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behaviour (JN)  

” 205. Mesquaresmall_normal Mark_Stringer RT @rapella “”our brains just don’t work the way we think they do”” (@leisa) #uxlondon thx @solle 2 days ago from web    ”

“our brains just don’t work the way we think they do” (@leisa)

when to do design research? I say it never stops

design research will get you empathetic ‘to solve a problem you must first understand it’ (Kim Goodwin)

“Search is users creating their own links. They type in the trigger word they were expecting. “”Bring your own link””

great mixture of people in this workshop from many different places and job types

@leisa asking everyone their names and 3 tags that describe them

Force writing: Come up with 2 words that are opposites and figure how they can work with the problem

#UXLondon is like sending the creative half of your brain to a gymnasium for days. Really enjoyable stuff.

I really am the only person here without an iPhone and a Mac

Ux mgmt. Key to growth and impact is to increase reputation. But how does one measure that?

Lots of shoes being waved in the air in this morning workshop with Eric Reiss.

the word ideation impresses clients

Excited about sketching workshop at #uxlondon. Won’t be tweeting, it’s pen time 🙂 pencil, then pen time (practiceyourgrip

If you have a good experience you will tell three friends. If you are an unhappy customer, you will tell 17 people

When users comparison-shop using pogostick techniques: purchase=11% . Compare to 55% using product lists

@lukewdesign: All my notes from #uxlondon today: http://www.lukew.com/ff/archive.asp

lukewdesign Left the pub to go hear design talks in a loft. What’s wrong with me?

@odannyboy workshop summary: Collaboratively sketch concepts rapidly and without fear. Quantity first. Refine and define later.

workshop summary: home pages should look more like site maps

Who will they invite next year: Alan Cooper, Jacob Nielsen and JJ Garrett? Tough deal to beat this lineup.

if your team succeeds all the time, then fire them. They’re not trying hard enough. Bill Buxton

@leisa: When users comparison-shop using pogostick techniques: purchase=11% . Compare to 55% using product lists

Another good day at #uxlondon. Not sure I agree with a couple of things @jmspool said however hard to argue with his real user testing stats

Learned how to draw a circle in UX London – put your pinky on the page and have a couple of practice gos in the air first

if you’re not spending time watching people use your site there is no way you’re designing a good site

The back button is the button of doom. When they use that you’re losing them already, beware!

the best way to solve arguments is to have everyone watching users actually using the site @jmspool

There is no-one at #uxlondon who anyone would want a ‘user experience’ with. I would like to give them an experinece of my Klingon #gesture  

@leisa: the best links are 7-12 words in length #uxlondon > Knowledge to pass on!

@jmspool asks – if Domino’s Pizza has a 7% conversion then what on earth are the other 93% doing on the site? Window shopping!

Users are more likely to click the home link while on the home page than click to view the featured content. Crazy!

anyone who tells you that your homepage is for brand, to learn about your products/your business etc. They’re wrong

Homepage purpose – to get people to other pages, usually to a category page. Divide real estate accordingly

alphabetical order is the same as random order in 99% of cases

Don’t be afraid to imitate when learning (not copy) great app design. Remember those that imitated the master artists?

sketchbooks aren’t about being a good artist, they’re about being a good thinker

people do NOT learn the structure of your site by using it. They have no sense of the orgsn of ur site, nor do they care

people who choose a ‘Store’ page tend to never choose another ‘Store’ page in the same session

Store pages = groups of department pages. Helps users tell the system what they *don’t* want to see (eg. business or sports)

people type very generic terms into search – this is the main reason search fails (behaviour not technology)

RITE Method – Rapid Iterative Testing and Evaluation and formative v summative testing approaches

Department pages are for windowing, gallery pages are for selecting. Users get this.

“I’m hearing the @jmspool stuff from #uxlondon with a big fat “”it depends”” looming in my head. Anyone else the same?   “

users are telling you every day what trigger words they’re looking for and on what pages. Look at your search logs.

“Changes in the web don’t change the fundamentals of human behaviour”” (@jmspool)

content sucks the user towards it (this is why your content has to suck… like a vacuum cleaner)

humans = informavours  

nobody goes to a website without a purpose. except web designers

It appears @jmspool is giving the exact same talk right now at #uxlondon that I saw on a roadshow 5 years ago. Still holds true, I guess.

only if you have Uniquely Identified Content (like Amazon) do you get an exception to the searching = predictor of problems rule  you are *much* more likely to find what you’re looking for if you DON’T use search

pogosticking = when the user bounces between levels of the information hierarchy seeking their target content page

3 scent failure predictors: use of the back button, pogo-sticking, use of search

the back button is the button of doom (repeat after @jmspool)

wireframing 2.0 #uxlondon goodies http://tr.im/uxlondongoodies

I like using watercolour because it is less controlled, it forces you to work with mistakes

the no.1 thing that users base the quality of their experience on is whether or not they complete their task

Users seek content. The Target Content page is the daddy of all pages. We need to scent to get a user there via Gallery Pages

Want to learn HTML? try these http://bit.ly/Roryw http://bit.ly/VE7sj

Target Content Page = the page the user is looking for to solve their objective. The most important page on the site for that user

Wonderful. Stuck in toilet cubicle at #uxlondon. Just my luck. can someone help?

interactive wireframes have to be in their native environment

RE: links. Be direct. Guide users with purpose and clarity avoid … the mechanics of clicking http://bit.ly/eyub

The limitations of our sense of vision could be informing design more strongly  

good design is like air conditioning. You don’t notice it unless there’s something wrong

things that stop ppl frm scrolling: Design elements tht look like the bottom-white space, text tht looks like disclaimer

users look for blue & underlines. yes, it’s ugly and hard to see but we’ve trained users to look for that.

what makes users confident – ‘i know where this link is going to take me’

you need to know – why are users coming to your site? what are their trigger words?

iceberg syndrome: people assume most important stuff is at top. If ‘marketing fluff’ is at top, don’t bother scrolling

Book idea from #uxlondon Innovation Games: Creating Breakthrough Products and Services http://bit.ly/rHBFN

The Lord’s Prayer

Posted in ideas, Online, Politics and links by solle on 17/06/2009

Oh Carter, who art in Government (briefly),
hallowed be thy name.
Thy Kingdom come,
thy licence will be done,
on rural earth as it is in heaven
Give us this day a rather poor connection.
And forgive us our piracies,
as we forgive those who pirate against us.
And lead us not into mobile temptation,
but deliver us from mobile evil.
For thine is the kingdom, the power and the glory. for ever and ever. Amen

What a grid day

Posted in design, ideas, information architecture, UX by solle on 10/06/2009

Yesterday was an excellent grid day. I discovered an excellent blog from Vladimir Carrer with a host of ideas around grids and layouts and handling typography – this one especially O rule + golden proportion for calculating the gutter in the grid

Carrer web log

and then remembered this indescribably good roundup of grid tools and resources by Fuel Your Creativity Grid Based Design Toolbox.

Grid Based Design Toolbox

Combine these two resources with The Grid System and inspiration like Information Architects and Mark Boulton Design and you should never find yourself stuck again.

Also check out this beta of the new Information Architects’ site

Further resource: 960 Grid System, Grid Systems – Making grids in Illustrator, The 1kb Grid System, Grid System Generator, Prototyping With The Grid 960 CSS Framework

Safari 4.0: better looking in beta

Posted in content, design, information architecture, UX by solle on 09/06/2009

After downloading Safari 4, I am disappointed to see Apple not stick with some of the tab ideas they had in the Safari 4 beta. What they’ve returned to I find muddled and confusing. In the beta the tabs were above the address bar and this seemed quite radical for a number of people. I found it refreshing and ‘open’ – the pulling of tabs into new windows was clear and straightforward and the tools/arrows/buttons for adding a new tab, viewing the rest of your open tabs and viewing any other bookmarks in the bookmark bar were clearly positioned (see below). The beta, like Firefox, really felt like a ‘tool set’ rather than just a browser.

Now in the released version the tabs have come back to the traditional position and the position of the tools/arrows/buttons for adding a new tab, viewing the rest of your open tabs and viewing any other bookmarks in the bookmark bar are now close together, two with identical icon and, my small amount of testing, encourage mis-selection and confusion. And pulling a tab out into a window is not clear at all.

It would be interesting to know what occurred during any testing for Apple to step back from the some of the innovations of the beta.

Safari 4

Safari 4

Safari 4 beta

Safari 4 beta

Watching digital readers

Posted in content, Data, ideas, Online by solle on 02/06/2009

One of the things our grandchildren will find quaintest about us is that we distinguish the digital from the real‘ William Gibson

Somewhere between Nicholas Carr’s ‘Is Google Making us Stupid?‘ and Clive Thompson on the Future of Reading in a Digital World there is the issue of how we are viewed when we read. It has become increasingly evident that depending on how you are reading, what you are reading and upon what you are reading you are viewed very differently.

how-computer-works

It is said that it is more acceptable to read a newspaper at the breakfast table than a paperback novel. Why? Is it because the viewer can see something of what the reader is reading and approximately where they are in their reading but with a paperback novel it is hard to establish exactly what is being read and where the reader is? Books can seem private and cut off.

Is reading a newspaper or magazine or book at the breakfast table more acceptable than reading from a Kindle (or like), laptop or iPhone (or like)? Why? Is it because the viewer can see something of what the reader is reading and approximately where they are in their reading – be it the title, the cover, the cover story or at very least that it is a book or a newspaper etc – but when the reader is using a digital device they can’t even be sure they are actually reading and if they are reading you have no way (apart from maybe facial expressions) what they are reading? Viewer feels no sense of engagement.

Of course in some circumstances (ie dinner party) it is frowned upon to read anything but especially a newspaper or a paperback novel but you might just be able to squeeze in reading a short summary of a sporting event on your mobile phone without too much objection (or risk of never being invited again).

Likewise when attending a lecture, panel event or roundtable it is perfectly acceptable to multi task reading connected and non connected stuff from a mobile phone or laptop – the feeling is that the reader is still engaged with their surroundings, involved with the event, in the conversation – but reading a newspaper or book in this environment would give the impression of non interest, non engagement, being separate from their surroundings (even though they may be reading something directly relevant).

Like the William Gibson quote describes, in time these differentiations will become quaint references to a time when individuals discussed the digital and non-digital/’real’.

Please comment below with any other references on the subject.

Thanks newhousedesign for Ladybird picture